RECENT REVIEWS & ENDORSEMENTS

  • Passions of the Wolf
    Beth Murray
    An absolutely fabulous read. Not at all what I was expecting but this book kept me up till the early hours of the morning as I became engrossed and found myself willing the main character to succeed. ~ Xtlil, Amazon

  • Passions of the Wolf
    Beth Murray
    This is a must read. It has a bit of everything for everyone and is so atmospheric. I love the writing style of this author and will definitely be buying more from her. ~ Amelia Carr, Amazon

  • Midnight Meanders
    Annika Jensen
    Solid characterisation, for example best friend Emma, underpinned by some stylish descriptive writing make this story a very pleasing and satisfying read. Recommended for all ages who have the urge to roam the night pavements. ~ Bob D, Amazon

  • Midnight Meanders
    Annika Jensen
    What a beautiful novel, full of friendship, faith, spirituality, the search for purpose, love, and connection. This book reached inside of me, and took me back to my own adolescence struggling with mental illness myself. ~ Drew Constance , Goodreads

  • Losing It
    Ross Gilfillan
    If you like Shane Meadows movies and enjoy Mike Leigh's comic gift for sustained social awkwardness, this may well be just the uncomfortably funny fiction for you. ~ Graham Higgins, Amazon

  • AlphaNumeric
    Nicolas Forzy
    The author builds a fresh and fascinating world that remains remarkably consistent given the environment. It's immediately accessible and always entertaining. Numbers live on one side, letters on the other, each with wonderful quirks in their respective territories. The characters are introduced at a solid steady pace, with the action taking place across the many parts of this very original world. ~ Sphinx Reader, Goodreads review

  • Color, Facture, Art and Design
    Iona Singh
    This is a book worth arguing with and an author
    who demands the attention of those who are interested
    in the possibilities of a materialist approach to
    understanding art as well as design or other built forms.
    Singh managed to provoke me about issues I did not
    even realize I had passionate feelings about and, in so
    doing, caused me to begin to refine and even re-define
    my own thoughts in relation to my love of art and its
    relationship to class and other social issues. It strikes
    me that this is exactly what she meant to do.
    Wayne Fife
    Memorial University of Newfoundland ~ Dr. Wayne Fife, What Might a Materialist Approach to Art Look Like: review of Color, Facture, Art and Design by Iona Singh, New Proposals: Journal of Marxism and Interdisciplinary Inquiry Vol. 10, No. 1 (April 2019) Pp. 58-6

  • Anthropology of Nothing in Particular, An
    Martin Demant Frederiksen
    ”The scope of nothing runs deep in the book as we are introduced to a motley crew of philosophical, political, literary and artistic roots seamlessly mixing tracks from Duran Duran, Pet Shop Boys, and Morrissey [through a conspicuous absence of his lyrics ] with insights from the group of young Nihilists along with Nietzsche, the Dude, Dostoevsky, Seinfeld, Sartre, Tarkovsky, Beckett (…) In Frederiksen’s ‘anthropology about nothing’ there is a comforting letting go, a succumbing to the fungus, an amassing of things that do not add up. The book both humours and mesmerizes, amongst other things, by way of its immersive fiction as Whiskey writes, dolphins perform, and the hero of Oz rides away into lavender sunsets – with a clean shave, organic grape juice diets, a tan. Or something.” ~ AllegraLab, http://allegralaboratory.net/review-an-anthropology-of-nothing-in-particular/

  • Grimworld
    Avery Moray
    Rating: 5 out of 5 stars. How can I even begin to describe this book? It was like reading a mashup of Coraline and The Nightmare Before Christmas. I could perfectly envision the telltale creepy stop animation in my mind of the ever dark Halloween esque town of Grimworld. Simply put, I loved this. It’s clever and original and genuinely creeped me out. For a children’s/middle grade book it did a fantastic job at being age appropriate yet suitably creepy. The gist of the story is that Henry Bats has lost something dear to him for the exchange of a rare comic. That something is a portion of his life and NO, HE DID NOT GET THE COMIC WHICH IS AN OUTRAGE. Of course he has to try to get his life back but time is literally ticking in the form of a pocket watch fused on his neck. With the help of some newfound friends Henry goes around the creepy, curious planes of Grimworld to take what is rightfully his. Characters:- They are all amazing in their own rights. Even the monsters. Especially the monsters. Special shoutout to Henry and Hattie’s grandpa who has an addiction to lettuce. I loved the interactions between all of the kids and I loved all the different creatures introduced. I had to add this to my favorite books of 2019 because it was that good and I will be buying this when it comes out. I don’t think my 7 year old is quite ready to read it yet as she gets scared easily but I’ll place it on the bookshelf. I hope to see more work from the author truly! ~ Amanda Lily (Reviewer), NetGalley

  • Pagan Portals - Gods and Goddesses of Wales
    Halo Quin
    I so enjoy reading about the old ways and the old gods of various cultures. Halo Quin is a pagan like myself, so I enjoy reading about her take on things spiritually. I wasn't familiar with Wales deities until this book. I was assuming they were the same as the rest of Britain and never gave them any thought. I should know better! Well, I am always on the look out for new knowledge! This was a great read! ~ Catherine Hankins (Reviewer), NetGalley

  • Being a Supervisor 1.0
    Joseph F Duffy, LLD
    In our organization we made this book a recommended introduction for a new supervisors and very needed read for long term leaders. Good reminder of an every aspect of daily human relations and environment that impact our effectiveness in dealing with our staff. ~ Anita Hassell, Amazon Books

  • Secret History of Christianity, A
    In a short space, and in a remarkably lucid style considering the intellectual heft of his subject matter, Mark Vernon brings together a great many insights into Christianity which, if not entirely new, he puts in a new light with reference to the peculiar philosophy of Owen Barfield.

    If, like me, you’ve tried tackling Barfield on the strength of his reputation (for instance, coming to his works via Verlyn Flieger’s seminal treatment in Splintered Light: Logos and Language in Tolkien’s World) and found his writing difficult to get into, Vernon’s approach here is welcome. He eschews the more academic, close-reading analysis of major texts in favor of a richly allusive introduction to them. In Vernon’s encouraging retelling, we get the context for the Christian story from its Hebrew and Greek roots through to its efflorescence, reformation, and decline as a religious and cultural force, rapidly bringing us all the way from the prophets and Plato right up to the present moment. ~ Wesley Schantz, A Pilgrim in Narnia blog

  • Chernobyl Privileges, The
    Alex Lockwood
    5 Star Rating: .....................Lockwood’s book offers a carefully researched examination of a number of key themes - principally, the use of nuclear power and the morality of this undertaking. Anthony describes himself as a validation of “...everything [these men] worked for: a child survivor who’d come back to love nuclear power.” This is presented against an atmosphere of increasing unrest in response to the Trident scheme; and our growing understanding, through flashbacks to Anthony’s childhood, of the direct impact of the nuclear fallout on the first responders, workers, and survivors. The Chernobyl Privileges also depicts a historic and ongoing mismanagement and poor understanding of nuclear energy – both the denial and attempted concealment of the Chernobyl disaster by the authorities in the eighties; and the Navy’s response to the incident on Tartarus in the present day, and their apparent poor comprehension of the implications. The Chernobyl Privileges has clearly been heavily researched, and is sensitive to the horrors of the accident, its aftermath, and the ongoing impact on survivors and their families. It balances an unfolding story in 1980s Ukraine against a backdrop of the present-day global nuclear debate. A highly recommended read. ~ Stephanie Know, Amazon

  • Chernobyl Privileges, The
    Alex Lockwood
    5 Star Rating: This is a novel written with a rare sensitivity backed by research that is communicated with skill and a lightness of touch. Set against a backdrop of environmental disaster, it is the story of a man learning how to survive the consequences of a traumatic past. It's one of those books that stays with you long after you have read the last page. A thought-provoking and compelling read. ~ Elizabeth E, Amazon

  • Chernobyl Privileges, The
    Alex Lockwood
    5 Star Rating: Alex Lockwood’s debut novel timeslips between the 1986 catastrophe at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and its horrific aftermath, and 21st Century Scotland, where Anthony, a Chernobyl survivor and former academic physicist, works as a radiation monitor at the Clyde Naval Base, home of Britain’s nuclear submarines. When a radiation leak leads to disastrous human and animal contamination, Anthony, already overwrought, anxious, and uncertain in his adopted homeland, becomes more jittery than ever, particularly as his marriage appears to be faltering. As he talks to protesters, friends, an environmental journalist, and his work colleagues, trying to determine the best way forward, the narrative makes way for incidental letters from Anthony’s younger sister, Sveta, who was not able to come to England, who did not survive Chernobyl as he did..........We see the families and communities torn apart, and nature damaged by human carelessness in a single catastrophic moment. But Lockwood also throws into sharp relief the rigid class divisions that continue to tear apart Great Britain, as well as the grinding poverty, physical and societal, that entrenches itself in communities subsumed in governmental and institutional lies..............Lockwood carves out room for hope as well, a reminder that there are alternatives, but that we must act on them. The Chernobyl Privileges is an unabashed and – particularly in these agitating times – highly appropriate rage against the destructive machine of power and its arrogance-based abuse. ~ Daneet Steffens, GoodReads

  • Chernobyl Privileges, The
    Alex Lockwood
    5 Star Rating: I highly recommend The Chernobyl Privileges. There are three things I love in what I read, great historical research, insightful commentary on current moral challenges and deep character exploration. They all are done well in this book but it is the intriguing manner in which the author combines them that makes it such a gripping read......This book brings the reality of the disaster to life, through the first hand experience of Antony, the protagonist, giving great detail to the immediate and subsequent impacts on those who lived around Chernobyl. Evacuated from Ukraine, Antony is drawn to nuclear research and ends up working in the UK’s nuclear deterrent, Trident. Looking at Trident through Antony’s lens allows the author to detail its environmental and moral obscenity. The best part of the novel is found in the conflicts and pain of Antony, as he seeks to come to terms with his past and its implications on his present, and how he can shape his own future. (less) ~ Simon Gill, GoodReads

  • Chernobyl Privileges, The
    Alex Lockwood
    5 Star Rating: The nuclear power plant catastrophe that befell Chernobyl lives on, not only in the physical world but in the psyche of its survivors. This amazingly researched novel explores the implications of these effects, and of how, some people never escape the guilt of survival, nor the insidious effects of those radiated particles silently infesting their genes. I was completely absorbed by the details about what actually occurred at Chernobyl, the immediate, and then the longer term biological and social devastation of the people. The writing is seamless, and obviously is a passionate concern to Alex Lockwood. Its a great book club read as the 370 pages race by, flowing in time and sequence to form a cohesive story that reaches out to the future. Plenty of themes to discuss.. the fall of Soviet Russia, international and national secrecy, the morality and wisdom of nuclear power and nuclear deterrent. On a personal level... sibling rivalry, loyalty to family and nation, betrayal of accepted values, guilt of survival... and always, the very deep seated human craving for a meaningful place in the world where we can love and be loved. The big and little pictures of moral and emotional dilemmas that we all face, and must somehow resolve. ~ Valerie Lawson, Goodreads

  • Temple of Dreams
    Carolyn Mathews
    A really well written book that transports you through time to Ancient Greece. The story flowed well in both time zones and was led by a cast of great characters. ~ Emma Gardner (Reviewer), NetGalley

  • Grimworld
    Avery Moray
    An Engaging Ghost Tale for an Early or Middle Grade Reader. The premise here is that our hero, Henry, is tricked by a ghost, (the "Vytiper"), into giving away the remaining years of his lifespan. The arcane "symbol" of the deal is a pocket watch that shows how much of his lifetime Henry has left. Henry has to undo the deal by tricking or somehow forcing the ghost to give back the hands of the watch so that Henry can restore his life time. That's not a bad tale at all, and you can see how the story will follow a path that shows us the trick, Henry's worry, his search for help and answers, his plan to defeat the ghost, the build up, the confrontation, and so on. The narrative is stripped down and fast paced. Everything happens quickly and the tale is told in short, direct sentences. There are lots of clever and engaging throwaway bits of background, scene setting, adventure, distractions, and deadpan humor, but the focus is always on moving the story along at speed. Sometimes it feels more like a campfire tale being recounted than it does a fully realized novel, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. ......So, this was fun and inventive and good natured; it struck me as a fine ghost tale/adventure for an early reader who didn't need anything too scary, and just twisty and action packed enough to also grab an older kid. ~ Joel Smith (Reviewer), NetGalley

  • Crystal Prescriptions volume 7
    Judy Hall
    Rating: 5 out of 5 stars. This is a very thorough book leading up to making essences with crystals, even including going into detail about different ways to cleanse and charge your crystals and how to decide which to choose. She also discusses grounding yourself prior, timing of making and using them, and multiple methods that can be used to make them. There are also sections on dowsing, chakras, astrology, and various charts and lists of when to use crystals for certain conditions, disorders, moods, addictions, etc. If you’re new to crystals, I would read some beginner books first before delving into the essences. The author does a good job with explaining some basics, but it would be helpful to have somewhat of an understanding in their uses in general first as this may seem a bit much at first. It may also be helpful to get a basic understanding of chakras, grounding, and intuition as this book gets pretty in-depth with all of those plus. It’s a great book, though, for someone ready to take their crystal practice into a more advanced form to get the most they can out of them. ~ Michelle Reeves (Reviewer), NetGalley

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