RECENT REVIEWS & ENDORSEMENTS

  • Bullet Gal
    Andrez Bergen
    "Featuring one of the toughest chicks on the planet." ~ , Nevada McPherson

  • Color, Facture, Art and Design
    Iona Singh
    "...this is a book written by a writer, it is 'writerly'. When Singh refers to paints and materials you can almost smell them, the concatenation of the sentences is fluid, enjoyable, prose. And this is not an easy subject, it is in fact a new approach to art, to understanding art," ~ Customer Review, Amazon

  • Call of the Forbidden Way
    Robert Owings
    This was an incredible story. The characters following the path of the Medicine Way are complex and diverse. Each has their own practice of communion with the Universe and the entities of the Dimensions. A new take on the fight between Good and evil and Light vs. dark. Amazing insights if you care to see them, I will read everything this author writes. ~ Margaret Holmes, NetGalley

  • Beat the Rain
    Nigel Jay Cooper
    Emotional to say the least! A fantastic journey of relationships and emotions with a surprising twist. Fantastic read. ~ Donna Barnes, Goodreads review

  • Beat the Rain
    Nigel Jay Cooper
    Beat the Rain is Nigel Jay Cooper's debut novel, and what an auspicious start to what will be an undoubtedly successful writing career. It's hard to say exactly what this book is about without giving too much away, so--read the book synopsis for plot details and I will share with you some of the great writing that's in this book. There's this:

    "Perhaps that’s how all relationships end, not with a bang but with the accumulation of millions of tiny moments that matter, going unnoticed by one partner or the other because life gets in the way. And then one day you both stop trying to make the other one notice anymore. And that’s it, the slow death is in motion. The rest is entropy."

    And this:

    "I can see things with such clarity now, such useless, blinding clarity. But what’s the point in that now? Knowledge isn’t always powerful. Sometimes, it’s just heart-breaking."

    And this:

    "I am my own narrator. Memory is an artist, an impressionist. She adds colour, sound, smell and emotion to events at her whim. She adds, subtracts and embellishes until the event she started documenting is quite unrecognisable to the others who also experienced it, but at the same time, is more truthful to the owner of the memory. There is no reality. There are only impressions of past events, made by a million selves, all interacting with each other, vying for superiority. Reality doesn’t exist, perhaps in the end, that’s my only truth."

    There's so many great passages like that throughout the book; simply exquisite and thought-provoking writing. The only problem I had with the book is that sometimes I felt that the characters did things for no good reason, they were unrealistic and just didn't make sense. Still, this is a great book and I highly recommend it.

    Thank you to Netgalley and Roundfire Books for an advance copy of this in exchange for an honest review. ~ Kristina Byington, Goodreads, Advance Reader Copy (NetGalley)

  • Bullet Gal
    Andrez Bergen
    Anti-heroines are a fascination to me. It started with Carmela of the HBO series 'Sopranos' and has since grown to recent characters like Olivia Pope and Piper Chapman. But what of characters outside of television? That’s where Bullet Gal/Mitzi comes in. She’s part Lisbeth Salander of the 'Dragon Tattoo' book series, part Lara Croft, part Jessica Jones. She fierce, rough around the edges, yet undeniably cool. This is someone you fear yet would also love to get drunk with.

    Andrez Bergen’s ‘Bullet Gal’ is a dark film noir/dystopian story. Our female lead finds out her vigilante lifestyle has consequences: a mark on her head. The chapters of this novella are from different character’s viewpoints. This technique gives the reader contrasting perspectives which makes for an investigative experience. The reader must piece the puzzle together and try to make sense of Heropa, just as Bullet Gal/Mitzi is doing.

    Pop culture enthusiasts will love the references to comics and will see a conglomerate of influences in this work. Andrez Bergen captures the film noir essence while keeping a steady flow of humor and intrigue. I was immersed into the world of Heropa and quickly found myself yearning to hear more from my new favorite anti-heroine, Bullet Gal. ~ Amanda, PopCultHQ

  • Bullet Gal
    Andrez Bergen
    "Andrez Bergen captures the film noir essence while keeping a steady flow of humor and intrigue. I was immersed into the world of Heropa and quickly found myself yearning to hear more from my new favorite anti-heroine, Bullet Gal!" ~ , PopCultHQ

  • Beat the Rain
    Nigel Jay Cooper
    Louise is grieving the death of her husband Tom. Tom has a twin brother called Adam letting go off her past is not easy and she thinks that by marring Adam it will make her pain go away. This is a phycological thriller which is both heartbreaking and funny. This book is not for people who can't cope with raw emotion as it will pull at your heartstrings. I would like to thank Net Galley, John Hunt Publishing and the author Nigel Jay Cooper for my ARC in exchange for an honest review. ~ Louise Wilson, NetGalley Advance Reader Review

  • Bullet Gal
    Andrez Bergen
    In 'Bullet Gal' (the novel) Andrez Bergen expands on the universe created in the original comic. This is an adaption that not only extends on the characters’ depth but also gives the readers a more humane look into Heropa itself, and the “phonies” living in it.

    The Bullet Gal in question is the guns blazing anti-heroine Mitzi, who has just arrived in Heropa to serve her own brand of justice. After putting a few holes in some unsuspecting gangsters, thus saving a little girl from child trafficking, Mitzi is surprised by a “bop” (or “cape”, as these super powered heroes like to be called) called Lee.

    He’s been keeping his eyes on Mitzi as she has blasted her way through Heropa’s criminals. Lee explains he’s there to offer her a chance to join the Crime Crusaders Crew; the knock off of Avengers in this universe. An offer Mitzi initially refuses, but as she starts seeing the advantages there are in joining such organisation, she eventually, though somewhat reluctantly, accepts it.

    This is how Bullet Gal’s path to becoming a true cape begins. Nevertheless, nothing is ever as it seems in Heropa.

    Bullet Gal will have to deal with a lot more than the criminal couple – French femme fatale Brigit and gangster boyfriend Sol – coming for her because of her misdemeanours. Something just isn’t right in this great city of superheroes. And her mentor Lee is keeping a few too many secrets.

    Just what exactly is going on beyond the closed doors of the Crime Crusaders Crew? What is Heropa hiding from its citizens? And how does Mitzi fit in all of this? Good questions, and the novel answers all, although in different ways than you might expect.

    We are given diverse perspectives throughout the novel. However, we start out with Mitzi, and her first person narration remains throughout the book. Even if the perspectives change to friends, allies, and even enemies, all others narrate in third person. Further proof to Mitzi’s involvement in the chaos that always reside in Heropa. Something that she doesn’t realise till the very end.

    Nice touch, Andrez. Nice touch.

    The author has created something which dives into full on meta territory with the noir genre and the golden age of superhero comic books. This novel adaption may not have the unusual but captivating photo manipulations the comic had – which plays an important role in the storyline’s twists and turns – but this actually works in its favour, by extending the dialogue and characters interactions we have a much bigger understanding on Bullet Gal‘s universe.

    If you’re a fan of the genre noir, superheroes and self-aware meta, then 'Bullet Gal' must be on your next purchase list. Though I still recommend picking up the comic. In fact, to read the novel alongside it. This, I believe, will make Bullet Gal‘s story more impacting and clear up a few things you may have found confusing in your first read. ~ Carol Days, Cultured Vultures

  • Bullet Gal
    Andrez Bergen
    "This is a (comic) adaption that not only extends on the characters’ depth but also gives the readers a more humane look into Heropa itself, and the 'phonies' living in it... If you’re a fan of the genre noir, superheroes and self-aware meta, then Bullet Gal must be on your next purchase list." ~ , Cultured Vultures

  • Beat the Rain
    Nigel Jay Cooper
    I would love to use something better than this worn-out cliché, but I'm tired today because of this book. So here goes, this really was an "emotional rollercoaster". One moment I was thinking things are picking up for the protagonists, perhaps this won't all go down the drain, the next moment it felt like I was being crushed, despairing, at the bleak bottom. And then there would be these really humorous scenes. That dinner party was hilarious.

    Beat The Rain is the story of a relationship that is gradually degenerating. Told from Louise's and Adam's perspectives, we learn right at the start that Louise's boyfriend, Tom, has died. Tom was Adam's twin brother. Louise and Adam get married. Not a spoiler, it's in the book's blurb. No further summary from me because the rest you will enjoy much more if you start reading this without knowing too much. 'Enjoy' may actually be the wrong word. This isn't the light reading you want to pick up for leisurely days on a sun lounger. In fact, if you're feeling sad or discontent with life, this may not be the best book to pick up at that moment. Also, if you need likable characters, forget it. Now I'm making this sound as if I wouldn't recommend this book. Not at all. This book is going to stay with me. The amazing thing is when I started this, I was expecting to read something different. To be honest, there were moments in the first half of the book when I thought about throwing in the towel and moving on. But this is a book you need to stick with. By the time Jarvis was introduced, about halfway through the book, I knew I couldn't put it down. Hence, feeling slightly tired today.

    This is a wonderfully insightful look at relationships covering themes such as loss and grief, parenthood, mental health and our preconceived ideas about what should and what shouldn't.

    I really loved the way how the author showed by means of the male and the female perspectives that two people can experience the same thing in completely different ways, thus creating two different versions of the truth. It was so frustrating. I don't know how many times I shouted at these characters to start bl**dy listening and to talk to each other.
    There were several times when I thought I could predict what Louise or Adam were going to do, and each time, Mr. Cooper surprised me. The ending didn't go the way I wanted it to. Usually, I would whine about that. In this case, it was actually the icing on the cake.
    Even taking into account my struggle with the first half of this book, which jumped about too much for me, I'm going to have to give this the full stars. This is a debut novel. Nigel Jay Cooper is a writer to keep on your radar. He is extremely perceptive and knows how to create a unique and painfully honest story.

    Thanks to John Hunt Publishing for granting me access to an ARC via NetGalley.
    ~ Petra Ayling, Netgalley, Amazon, Goodreads review (Advance Reader Copy)

  • Your Simple Path
    Ian Tucker
    I bought this book having discovered it on Amazon and after viewing Ian's website, The book profoundly affected me especially the "little me" chapters which I immediately related too. Having read the book several times and recommended it to others I had the opportunity to go and see Ian speak, something again I would recommend to anyone. I bought his CD to help me live The Simple Path and although I'm not perfect yet in all my undertakings with others and situations I find myself in, It helps me stop worrying (praying) for things I don't want to happen and apply the laws of attraction by being grateful for what (and who) I have in my life. Passing it on really works, its surprising how much good feeling you get back in return! ~ Steve Kimber, Amazon UK

  • Visions Through a Glass, Darkly
    David I. Aboulafia
    "...a very enthralling tale that might just inspire some readers to keep the lights on for a few nights...the perfect book to blow your mind." ~ Damnetha Jules, HorrorPalace.com

  • Visions Through a Glass, Darkly
    David I. Aboulafia
    "....a masterpiece...If the readers think this is just another suspense novel, they couldn’t be more wrong..." ~ , SeriousReading.com

  • Color, Facture, Art and Design
    Iona Singh
    "Color, Facture, Art and Design contributes to the theory of the aesthetic level by reducing art down to its fundamental components; the art materials and techniques of construction and the affects these elements have on the eyes, bodies and minds of the viewers. These basic foundations, conceptual building blocks, are then reduced further to explore the intricacies of color sense perception and its relationship to disciplines beyond art. Links to philosophy, physiology, linguistics and psychoanalysis enables fresh understanding and even predictions for art, design and architecture. The book includes an in-depth study of artworks by Uccello, Vermeer, Turner and Yves Klein...." ~ Thalo.com, http://www.thalo.com/articles/view/397/color_facture_art_and_design

  • Color, Facture, Art and Design
    Iona Singh
    ".... Iona Singh argues that, in a world saturated with industrially produced synthetic colours: dyes made from coal tar, a by-product of oil production, we are losing touch with any meaningful connection with the materiality and facture of colour and our sensory perception. ‘Use of these strong, lightfast and inexpensive synthetic colors are at the expense of nuance, tincture and the plenitude of natural formation.’ She suggests that the ubiquity of coal tar colours in the built environment has contributed to the alienation of the senses and our estrangement of colour on an aesthetic level – colour is divorced from structure and does not appeal to the body in any real material sense anymore: relationships are lost and thereby the ‘sensual ground of related cognitive processes...." ~ Katrina Blannin, Monochrome/Duochrome, Abcrit blog #5, https://abcrit.wordpress.com/2015/03/01/5-monochromeduochrome-thoughts-on-colour-materiality-and-dependency-part-1-organised-by-katrina-blannin/

  • Color, Facture, Art and Design
    Iona Singh
    ...I am struck by the novelty and ingenuity of the author's arguments about the physical construction of Vermeer's work and the anti-transcendence that attention to this material aspect makes possible. I like very, very much as the argument that Vermeer shows the way to a sensuous-and not narrated-appreciation of a work of art, and that this sensuousness, shown to be the result of manual labour and manipulation of the materials, helps to de-construct the narrative of transcendence. This is really brilliant stuff,.... ~ Jack Ameriglio, Rethinking Marxism

  • Color, Facture, Art and Design
    Iona Singh
    I think the author has the potential to make quite a splash with the presently well-argued thesis about how the materials aspects of the construction of Vermeer's paintings account to a large degree for the "aesthetic effect" that is seized on for questionable purposes-by many bourgeois and even Marxist critics. This paper serves as a great corrective regarding the exclusively "narrative" focus of contemporary cultural criticism and the neglect of the material "determinants' of narrative in painting and more generally, in all forms of creative production. ~ Jack Ameriglio, Rethinking Marxism

  • Gift of an Angel, The
    Wendy Jane Erlick
    Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    I love this book and feel it is a must read for anyone of spirituality. Angels are an amazing energy to experience. Having the author help guide you through a first attempt at contact is beyond helpful. She also gave a practical pantheon of Angels for you to continue your work with.. The angels then channel thru the author to us. I was enthralled with her personal stories. What she shared was beyond personal and emotionally uplifting. I can't wait to show this book off to friends I know who are having personal difficulty.. I'm hoping this book will give them the emotional boost that it gave me. ~ Mary Ebert, NetGalley

  • Witch's List, The
    Andrew Cairns
    Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Full Text: Sandy Beech doesn't believe in witches and the supernatural. However, certain strange events occur which put his skepticism to the test: a burning book, a falling crucifix, a mysterious illness, and a fire in a convent which kills all twelve nuns. On her death bead, Bernadette, the last surviving nun, warns him to control his lusts and avoid African women. Sandy finds this difficult, since he is attracted to exotic, dark-skinned women and after his hedonistic university exchange year in Paris, marries Rocky from the Ivory Coast. Five years later, childless and with the marriage souring, they decide to visit Rocky's home country. Sandy is drawn into a world of strange beliefs and practices: he finds out about the Witch's List - a list of people destined to die, and is attacked by various animals starting with a ferocious dog in Abidjan. He delves further and further into the realm of African witchcraft, but the horrific truth remains obscure... The Witch's List is the first of a trilogy. The description of the book and the cover hooked me when I was asked to read and review this book. "Once you're on the Witch's List, you are as good as dead." That was the best hook for me! Sandy is living and going to school as a normal Scottish lad. Not so popular, but good at hiding from the bullies. This is where he discovers an old book about witches and black magic. He and his friend are really more interested in the sexy pictures but one day decide to test the book against the Bible. When the book catches fire, Sandy is not quite sure what to think. As he goes off to school in France, he falls hard for a beautiful African girl. Even though he has been warned by the nun, Bernadette and others to stay far away from African women, he just can't. He falls in love and marries what he thinks is the love of his life. Until a trip back to the Ivory Coast to visit her relatives. From here things took a strange turn and I am really glad to hear this is a trilogy as I had a lot more questions! One of the things I liked best about Mr. Cairn's writing was the use of the every day Scottish language. Sandy and his friends talk exactly the way they would in their part of the world and I enjoyed that. What a really good book for us history buffs too. We wait impatiently for the next one! ~ Patricia Romero, NetGalley - Goodreads

©2016 John Hunt Publishing Ltd.