RECENT REVIEWS & ENDORSEMENTS



  • Awakening Human Being, The
    Barbara Berger
    There is so much information packed into this amazing book. I suggest you read this book, by taking your time, digesting each chapter with thoughtfulness. When you discover the wisdom contained in each one, you will know the mental laws that define the power of thoughts. There truly is a cause-and-effect relationship between our thoughts and our experiences in life. Her practice tools are easy to understand and to incorporate into your life. And, don’t take it all too seriously….the ending is humorous….and resonated with me…. ~ Deborah Lloyd, Author Believe and It Is True



  • Adventures of Pebble Beach, The
    Barbara Berger
    This is a woman’s story, no doubt about it. This is Barbara’s first novel and it’s so damned believable! Pebble’s inner dialog is the key to this book being a fantastic read.
    Pebble could be you and she could be me.
    Pebble lives in Copenhagen but she’s originally from the US, she has two sons and she’s recently divorced. She’s almost 45 and she’s struggling with the very same things every single woman has struggled with.
    ~ Mary Nale, Attune Magazine



  • Spirited Nature
    Simon Gordon Wheeler
    Like many others nowadays, Simon Gordon Wheeler in Spirited Nature: Healing Adventures in Rural Ireland (O-Books, UK £11.95 / US $19.95, March 2014), echoes the oft-quoted words of Teilhard de Chardin (1881-1955), the French philosopher, scientist and Jesuit priest: ‘We are not human beings having a spiritual experience, we are spiritual beings having a human experience.’

    Half a dozen pages from the end of his book, Simon says: ‘We are spiritual beings trying to be human, not human beings trying to be better spirits.’ This is the essence of what he has to say.

    If the book had been a typical memoir or travelogue about a townie moving from the UK to live in rural Ireland, it would surely have been entitled A Mouse in the Toaster (taken from an amusing incident which Simon describes). But it is far from that particular genre, although the first part of it is an entertaining and acutely observed evocation, for the uninitiated, of life in the Irish countryside, and Simon’s intrepid dealings with chickens, ducks, goats and the neighbours.

    An English and drama teacher and a counsellor, Simon gives up his comfortable middle-class life in England to be with an old girlfriend, Sally, who has a smallholding in Wicklow, when she falls ill. Like his great-grandfather, Simon is a dowser and his mother is a healer, so he is primed in some ways for his ‘healing adventures’.

    Through tales of healing, mediumship, dowsing and shamanism, Spirited Nature recounts Simon’s interaction with various kinds of spiritual energy and how he reconciles living with equal ease in the material world and the world of the spirit. In the latter, he discovers many ‘sub-worlds’. We can see how the book’s title works on two levels: the spirits in Nature, and the acquisition of the author’s own ‘spirited nature’. ~ Geoff Ward, http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-news/16927299-healing-tales-from-rural-ireland



  • Bald New World
    Peter Tieryas Liu
    Perhaps a century in the future, all humans suddenly go bald, putting wig factory owners like filmmaker and womanizer Larry Chao in the spotlight. Larry’s best friend, cameraman Nicholas Guan, fights for his own identity in this thought-provoking story where fakery is preferred over the real. Liu (Dr. 2) crafts a vivid, imaginative setting with lush descriptive phrases: “Beijing had become a city of vapors, a metropolis of neon calligraphy... Store names floated in mid-air, Mandarin phrases wandered the alleys like unforgiven spirits, and a sentence cried for redemption, crucified in mist.” What begins as a broad farce with spy girls and gadgets gradually becomes a serious commentary on the nature of self. Nick struggles against those who would reform, use, or manipulate him, trying to find himself in a world strewn with literal false faces. Gorgeous language choices combine with Nick’s philosophical journey of personal discovery to create a deceptively deep story. ~ Best Summer Books 2014, Publishers Weekly - http://best-books.publishersweekly.com/pw/best-books/summer-reads-2014/sf-fantasy-horror#book/book-6



  • Your Simple Path
    Ian Tucker
    Fantastic book, excellent guide lines which are simple to follow, easy to understand and can be life changing! Best book l have ever purchased. ~ Lyn, Amazon, UK



  • Why are Animals Funny?
    EDA Collective
    Have you ever considered the ideological function of standing on a crowded train? Maybe not, because (in my experience) usually the only thought that comes to mind is how horrible and overpriced the train is and what your plans are upon arriving at your destination. In their new book ‘Why Are Animals Funny?’ Everyday Analysis (EDA) – a group of Manchester- and London-based writers known as the ‘EDA Collective’ – offers a critical, philosophical, psychoanalytical perspective of things we experience every day that are often accepted, unchallenged and unquestioned.

    In the spirit of Roland Barthes’ ‘Mythologies’, the 46 short articles make up a compendium of cultural and political analysis. The articles were collected from their blog http://www.everydayanalysis.com/ which began back in January 2013 and is still regularly being updated. Some of the articles are funny and droll, while some incite discontent, and others evoke empathic understanding and a sheepish “I never thought about it that way before”; all are wonderfully written, well-informed, and (most importantly, I think) accessible.

    One of my favourite features about this book is how aware the writers are of the difficulty and complexity of their material, and how they are able to avoid long, winding explanations, giving only the important information and presenting it in such a manner that educational and reading level is all but rendered moot. One of the great successes of the book is its ability to simplify without patronising its readers or losing any of the academic rigour upon which it is founded.

    While being as entertaining and as enjoyable to read as any mainstream novel or magazine, the book also serves a didactic purpose: it shows lucidly that everything we see and say and do in our lives, every song on the radio, every film in the theatre, every tweet on the Twitter has a wider impact than we might originally think. All too many reviewers have said about a book that it will change the way you look at the world and now the phrase is tired and meaningless. In this case, however, the book’s critical eye affects your real one and does (in a very literal sense) change the way you look at the world.

    So, if you want to know more about Jacques Lacan’s ham & cheese toastie of the mind, Justin Bieber’s latest faux pas, your favourite internet meme, or why Richard Dawkins is a b*llend, I absolutely recommend you read this book. ~ Ruari Paton, Voix Magazine



  • Clampdown
    Rhian E. Jones
    "I’d recommend it to anyone who wants to side-step recollections and simplifications of their own youth or by into the legislated nostalgia of their elder peers, but actually approach history as a continuation and a continuum, and the rock-myth of monumental, moment-based events are in denial of the wider sweep of history. Or less wankily, if you want to know the other side to the media fairy-tale, this is where to look. In short, in a time when Britain is in a retro period, it’s a necessary purgative." ~ Kieron Gillen, http://kierongillen.tumblr.com/post/83315660182/clampdown



  • Less Dust the More Trust, The
    Adeline van Waning, MD PhD
    The shamata project: a scientific study of the influence of meditative practices on participants' physical and mental wellbeing. It was scientific research, but not ‘science as usual’ for important new dimensions were added. The project included a close study of the lived experiences of the participants. Their 'subjective' first person experiences were taken into account as an important source, to be included in 'objective' scientific research. Natural science, psychology and first person direct experience in close interaction. The author of this book, Adeline van Waning - having both a scientific background and a longstanding experience in meditation - used her position as a participant for carefully documenting her experiences in the various shamatha meditations, the felt-sense of the day to day effects on her body-mind. How with the lessening of ego-concerns (the dust) her trust in ‘just being’ and surrender to the unfolding process increased. With their deep commitment to the project, their intense meditation practice, their (silent) contacts with each other, and their receptivity to the overall guidance by the co-organizer in the project, B. Alan Wallace PhD - the participants were not a group of passive research objects. Far from it, as the case of Van Waning shows, they were active co-creators of what was developing. In reading this fascinating book a new vision of science dawns on the reader: might doing science be more like co-creating new situations by subjects rather than collecting more and more facts about objects? ~ Ilse N. Bulhof PhD., Prof. dr, Philosophy



  • Less Dust the More Trust, The
    Adeline van Waning, MD PhD
    With her rich background as a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst and her mindfulness teaching and Buddhist practice, Adeline Van Waning entered into an experimental retreat in concentration practice, led by Alan Wallace (with Wallace as the meditation teacher, and Clifford Saron as the scientific research coordinator). Coming from the Netherlands to join the retreat in Colorado, Adeline had a perfect perspective to watch her subjective and intersubjective reactions as she proceeded through a three-month retreat in which her objective brain signals and changes were being carefully monitored by electrodes. “The Less Dust, the More Trust - Participating in The Shamatha Project, Meditation and Science” takes the reader through her journey from her various points of view: her personal journal, the practical instructions given for a variety of meditation practices, her growing understanding of Dharma, and the scientific purposes of the experiment she is participating in. If you are a mindfulness practitioner, a Buddhist, a psychotherapist, or someone interested in any of these disciplines, you will be wholly enriched by following Adeline’s fertile and wise journey. She is a careful reporter, a charming companion and an accomplished teacher. I strongly recommend this book to meditators and teachers of the Dharma. ~ Polly Young-Eisendrath, PhD., Author, Mindfulness Teacher and Jungian Analyst



  • Secret Life of Love and Sex, The
    Terence Watts
    From the moment you start reading, it is evident that this book sets itself apart from the myriad others on the subject by posing a question right at the beginning that will make most people sit up and think! From there on, it continues to be an eye-opener, addressing many familiarly difficult situations in a fresh and uncompromising manner, each designed to help the reader get the maximum understanding of how to make changes easily.
    Those who have never managed to find a truly fulfilling relationship will discover how to address the problem and find the perfect life partner. On the other hand, those who have trouble ending things when they need to will find out how to do that elegantly, kindly and without causing unnecessary pain. Between those two extremes, there is plenty of help to keep a loving relationship alive, vibrant, and rewarding. Perhaps one of the most useful sections is that on the ‘Bus Stop Syndrome’ where a relationship has become stale and arid; the advice here will help the reader to put not just one but several sparks back into the mix to rediscover the joy that existed at the beginning.
    “Sex can be passionate, loving, sweaty, romantic, animalistic, exhausting, inspiring, exhilarating, quick, slow, unwilling, joyful, hard work, spontaneous, experimental, awkward, embarrassing, ecstatically crude, wonderfully rude and much more besides. No wonder it’s the cause of so many problems and difficulties!” So starts the chapter on ‘Sex and Sexuality’... This book is plain-speaking, practical and a gold-mine of information and ideas, even looking at the role that personality plays in the game of love and sex. If you’re already in a good relationship, ‘The Secret Life of Love and Sex’ will make it even better, if you’re not, then this book is a ‘must buy’!”

    David Reeves,
    Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine.
    Fellow of the Association for Professional Hypnosis and Psychotherapy. (APHP)
    A member of the Profession Specific Board as an advisor to the CNHC.
    Chairman: Learning for Life, ( a mental health charity)
    Chairman: UK Confederation of Hypnotherapy Organisations ( UKCHO)
    President: The National Register of Advanced Hypnotherapists. (NRAH) ~ David Reeves



  • Dictionary of Magic & Mystery, The
    Melusine Draco
    I admit that I don’t normally ‘read’ dictionaries, but this one by Mélusine Draco really is as gripping as any thriller. The proverbial page-turner, with its tantalising introduction and often startling entries. Every fiction or non-fiction writer should give this wonderful reference book space on their desks, not only to show what lies beneath our present day, so-called ‘civilisations,’ but also as a conduit to what may well lie beyond. To step from their comfort zones and give their work ambition, fresh interest. A need to take the reader on more unusual journeys.

    I am convinced of a growing fascination with alternative spiritualities. Of other ways of living life and of dying. Melusine Draco, delivers her expert and painstaking research into all this in such a way that will surely ignite further enthusiasm. She takes us from the Argentinium Astrum - the Order of the Great white Brotherhood (Adepts) founded by Aleister Crowley; the Abbots Bromley Horn Dance; Alphitomancy - which will make you look at barley bread in a new light - to the Field of Reeds and Dead Man’s Teeth, to Sea Witches and beyond.

    I found myself making excited notes on Podomancy, Cramp Rings and the Angel of Death – and already wondering where these different springboards could lead.

    Within the dictionary format, the work is helpfully constructed into sections, ie; Black Magic, White Magic, while references for further research are relevant and not too copious.

    In a crowded marketplace where the ups and downs in publishing are ever more pronounced, I’m convinced this amazing volume will stir the writer’s imagination and help to get their work noticed.

    Unique and memorable. ~ Sally Spedding, The New Writer



  • Productive Body, The
    Didier Deleule
    François Guéry
    Philip Barnard
    Stephen Shapiro
    François Guéry, in his commentary [in The Productive Body] on the fourth section of Book 1 of Capital shows that the humanist protests, such as those of Friedman or Marcuse, against part time work rest on an error in the localization of the scission of the body. ~ Jean-François Lyotard, “The Desire Named Marx” in Libidinal Economy



  • Productive Body, The
    Didier Deleule
    François Guéry
    Philip Barnard
    Stephen Shapiro
    How exactly should we understand this famous productivity that is attributed to labor power [la force du travail], and how should we describe, or rather re-describe it? This is the theme that Didier Deleule and François Guéry took up in their succinct work on The Productive Body. ~ Pierre Macherey, “Power: From Politics to the Economy [Le Pouvoir, de la Politique à l’Economie]”



  • Your Simple Path
    Ian Tucker
    I really enjoyed this book. Yes it's simple, yes there's not much to it, but that's the beauty of it. Ian Tucker's writing really resonated with me. It was warm and from the heart, something I find lacking from many authors nowadays.
    I appreciate that many people didn't rate it, and felt they should be told more, but this is a personal journey book, you take from it what you need. It's not designed to tell you what to think, or to give you the answer to life, the universe and everything, it is just there to make you stop and think about what is really important to you.
    There's one message that comes through this book, treat others as you would like them to treat you. That is the simple path. There must be something to it, as that's the same lesson that pretty much all the major religions try to teach, they just had bigger books.
    So to sum up, this book doesn't preach, doesn't judge, or tell you what to do, it just gives a little reflection space, let's you know that you're doing ok really, then gives some tools to help keep you going, whatever your faith, belief (or lack thereof), or background. ~ Jim, Goodreads



  • Your Simple Path
    Ian Tucker
    This book is one of the toughest books I have reviewed, because I do not want to be negative as I can see what the author is trying to achieve, yet for me, it sadly fell short of the mark.

    The book differs from a typical self-help book in the way that it is meant to be read chronologically, and there are no chapter pointers to go to for specific areas or to flick around the book. I admire the author's ambition in this, but for me, this style just did't quite work, as I don't particularly want to read a self-help book cover to cover in order to find some great advice.

    I like the aesthetic style of the book; its simplistic and soft colour scheme and the simple structure and typesetting of the text itself, although this occasionally presents a disadvantage. For example, Tucker gives the reader exercises to do, which I feel could be greatly improved by being accompanied with a visual aid, like self-help books often do, because I think it is often much more inspiring to see a visual. I don't feel comfortable with constantly comparing this book with other self-help books, as I understand how the author is trying to move away from that, but with the purpose, content and intended audience of this book, it just cannot be avoided. I have read other reviews that suggest that Tucker is trying to create a more philosophical non-fiction read, but I just did not see this as there was very little in-depth content about philosophy itself that most people wouldn't already have some knowledge of.

    The writing tone is personal and fairly simplistic too, which is perfect for a book such as this. There are lots of direct questions to the reader, encouraging us to think for ourselves and about ourselves.
    The author is refreshingly honest and soft in tone, with a lot of personal anecdotes. While this is nice, it reduces the amount of tangible and practical advice.

    I would not discourage a person from trying this book, and I feel oddly neutral about it. I believe it would be very successful with particular readers, and I feel that it is one of those books that heavily depends upon personal taste. ~ Annabel, Goodreads



  • Your Simple Path
    Ian Tucker
    Your Simple Path is not a book i would normally reads. However i found the book very interesting and read through it in a matters of days!

    The book Your Simple Path gave me a positive outlook and genuinely feel that others who read it will also feel the same.. The book challenges us to think about our own experiences and how we lead our lives!! ~ Kim Sly, Goodreads



  • Your Simple Path
    Ian Tucker
    I like these types of books regarding peace and happiness but don't normally give them a great deal of credit. You could say I am a bit cynical but this took me by surprise.
    It was such a simple book and wasn't full of things you have to do to change your life it seemed that it gave a new outlook. It came to me at a rather tiring time and I have to say I feel so much better and more open to the changes. ~ Carol Peace, Goodreads



  • Your Simple Path
    Ian Tucker
    A great and inspirational read. Some great ideas to implement in my life. Starting to notice the difference after only a couple of days. ~ Anneka Vriesema, Goodreads



  • Your Simple Path
    Ian Tucker
    Awesome reading, helped me to understand life and how to find happiness in simple things in life-steps that I wish I would have had years ago as it may have lead me down a different path in my life. ~ Dave Darlene, Amazon USA



  • Your Simple Path
    Ian Tucker
    I would say that this is a lovely gentle work that removes the need for further self guilt or doubt, it neither preaches nor demands, it simply says there are other ways worth looking at things, it allows us to gently consider the patterns that we create in our life and decide if they truely serve us or any purpose. It helps us to deal with things that may not sit well, and mostly it gives a warm and sunny feeling, we are important, what we think and feel is important, and if by chance we realise that we have been unkind to ourself or others, it allows us to begin to re-balance without feeling a failure to begin with. Your Simple Path is an excellent piece of work, nicely written with actual ways to help us help ourselves, sometimes the most simple things are the most important. No matter your views this is well worth a read, and as you change or life changes many parts of this work will become more or less relevant, but always useful. I would highly recommend this work, as a therapist and healer I can see the advantages of more people making use of the information within.. ~ Angela, Amazon UK